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VIDEO "We can save lives": Rural GPs reflect on the importance of accessible CPD training


3rd July 2023
Supported by NAB Foundation, RDN recently hosted a series of one-day Advanced Life Support (ALS) Workshops for country-based GPs at the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Orange. We sent our camera to capture some thoughts from participants about the importance of bringing CPD training to rural areas.

RDN hosts ALS training in Orange

Supported by NAB Foundation, RDN recently hosted a series of one-day Advanced Life Support (ALS) Workshops for country-based GPs at the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Orange. We sent our camera to the event to capture some thoughts from participants about the importance of bringing CPD training to rural areas.

ALS Instructor, Shane Lenson, conducted the ALS Level One course and spoke about the importance, for GPs and the community, of bringing such essential training to rural and regional locations such as Orange. 

“The course is… for clinicians who don’t practise resuscitation all the time, but might encounter a patient who’s deteriorating or become unwell really quickly or in those early stages of resuscitation,” said Shane. 

“If we didn’t conduct these courses within these areas, all of these rural clinicians would have to travel to capital cities to undertake the training which leaves the regional areas without a workforce,” he said.  

 

Doctors reflect on importance of accessible CPD training

Doctors were in attendance from all points of the compass. Dr Veerendra Yaramati travelled in from the small community of Urana, around 120 km from Wagga Wagga. Originally from India, Dr Yaramati told RDN how much he loves working with farmers in a small community and offered this advice to practitioners considering a move to the bush: "Try to come and work in the countryside and feel the beauty of the work and how much you will get it back from the community, the job satisfaction... it is a win-win situation for both doctors and the countryside population," he told RDN.

Dr Yaramati was grateful for the opportunity to train in a regional hub. "Honestly speaking, Australian country communities need a lot of doctors and the best example is the practice where I come from," he said. "We have to close the clinic if I'm not there."  

RDN interviewed several country doctors on this important topic on the sidelines of the training day, including Dr Samantha Fitzpatrick of Dubbo, Dr Chean Chong of Bathurst, and Dr Atanu Paul of Parkes, who also appear in the video link below:

 

Video previews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAB FOUNDATION SUPPORT

Bringing training, networking and knowledge exchange to doctors working west of the ranges is all part of RDN’s vision for improving access to health care for all Australians, no matter where they live.

Earlier in the year, the NAB Foundation awarded RDN $35,000 to host ALS workshops in locations more accessible to regional and rural GPs. “NAB is here to help customers, colleagues and their communities withstand and recover from natural disasters, so we’re incredibly proud to be supporting the NSW Rural Doctors Network and the work they’re doing in the community,” said a spokesperson for Foundation. 

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